Social economic and political factors that led to the french revolution

There was a countrywide discontentment and dejection in France due to the evil deeds of the king. Political, Social and Economic Causes Article shared by: Turgot tried to minimise the expenditure of the royal court. Crores of francs were spent for the maintenance of the luxurious mansions.

Membership in such courts, or appointment to other public positions, often led to elevation to the nobility the so-called Nobles of the Robeas distinguished from the nobility of ancestral military origin, the Nobles of the Sword.

Eastern and southern Europe, more rural at the outset of the period, changed more slowly and in somewhat different ways. Europe witnessed important common patterns and increasing interconnections, but these developments must be assessed in terms of nation-state divisions and, even more, of larger regional differences.

Helmolt argued that the issue was not so much the debt per se, but the way the debt was refracted through the lens of Enlightenment principles and the increasing power of third-estate creditors, that is, commoners who held the government's paper.

The inequalities prevailing in the society created much discontentment among the masses and forced them to oppose the prevalent social structure. These unwieldy systems led to arbitrary and unequal collection of France's consumption taxes. The common people living on their estates had to take things from these establishments.

The upper clergy utilised the wealth of the church according to their own wishes and led a life of pleasure, luxury and immorality. Its inception resulted from many trends in European society, cultureand diplomacy during the late 19th century.

Taxes were high and so were prices, but the wages were low. In each country, servicing the debt accounted for about one-half the government's annual expenditure; where they differed was in the effective rates of interest.

They also tend to buy en masse in areas of good harvests to sell in areas of bad harvests where profits could be greater, causing significant price increases and shortages all over and affecting more people more quickly.

The French Revolution broke out inand its effects reverberated throughout much of Europe for many decades. Apart from the royal taxes, peasantry had to pay various kinds of taxes to the church and the clergy.

These letters made the people feel insecure of their lives, even if they had done nothing wrong they always had to fear that a minister would not get along with them and then they may receive a letter.

They made up hardly one percent of the total population of France; even so they enjoyed all the rights and privileges. They also had a soft corner for the masses who were groaning under the yoke of the nobility and the clergy. The social causes also led to the outbreak of the revolution.

The revenue collectors tortured them severely. By the government realised the problem they were in, but they were already far into it by then. There was no definitepolicy of the nation and everywhere signs of chaos and confusion could be seen.

All four of these causes together are what really caused the French Revolution. It mattered the least whether they possessed the requisite qualification or not. The population of France in the s was about 26 million, of whom 21 million lived in agriculture.

The king lived in Versailles along with his family and the courtiers were completely drowned in the luxuries. Successive French kings and their ministers had tried with limited success to suppress the power of the nobles but, in the last quarter of the 18th century, "the aristocracy were beginning once again to tighten their hold on the machinery of government".

France became bankrupt due to over expenditure in wars and luxury. At the same time, this was a century of growing nationalismin which individual states jealously protected their identities and indeed established more rigorous border controls than ever before.The social causes also led to the outbreak of the revolution.

The inequalities prevailing in the society created much discontentment among the masses and forced them to oppose the prevalent social structure.

The French society was mainly divided into two classes: (i). Financial: France's debt, aggravated by French involvement in the American Revolution, led Louis XVI to implement new taxations and to reduce privileges.

What were the Political Causes of French Revolution?

Political: Louis XVI faced strong opposition from provincial parlements which were the spearheads of the privileged classes' resistance to royal reforms. Without this type of cause it is very likely that the revolution in France ever would have happened.

Causes of French Revolution: Political, Social and Economic Causes

Even so there are three other important factors to the revolution, Political, Social, and Cultural. All four of these causes together.

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What Were Some Social Causes of the French Revolution?

political causes of French Revolution. abuse of monarchy economic causes of French Revolution. over taxation unequal distribution of taxes.

What were the Social Causes of French Revolution?

social hierachy. The social causes also led to the outbreak of the revolution.

What were the Political Causes of French Revolution?

The inequalities prevailing in the society created much discontentment among the masses and forced them. 3. Economic Cause: The economic condition of France formed another cause for the outbreak of the French Revolution. The economic condition of France became poor due to the foreign wars of Louis XIV, the seven years War of Louis XV and other expensive wars.

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Social economic and political factors that led to the french revolution
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